Tag Archives: beach

Two still life and two landscape oil paintings

I completed another blue painting of quince flowers inspired by the tonalist works of Whistler and Inness. I used thick cobalt blue to mark the petals. Cobalt blue is really pretty and I will have to use it again soon as a standalone color. This was painted on oil primed linen that I got on clearance from Blick. It’s a pricey, but wonderful support to paint on.

Cobalt blue still life

Previously I posted that I loved the look of raw linen and the universe heard me… Nancy Cuevas shared with me this product that Jerry’s Artarama sells of clear primed linen.

Footprint still life

The weave isn’t quite as nice as the first one but it’s an interesting challenge to preserve the beauty of the raw linen as a ground. Here’s one that I’m going to call “Footprint Still Life”. It’s a much quicker study and I accidentally stepped on it. I think I like it as is but stay tuned I may play with it some more.

I finally completed the small oil painting of my trip to Bandon Beach this past summer. These last two paintings are on canvas board, probably the least fun support to paint on but it’s nice to having something that is ready to go to prevent procrastination.

Bandon Beach

This last painting is a gift and inspired by my trip to Lake George in upstate New York. Lake George was immortalized by the great Georgia O’Keeffe. This painting comes nowhere near her genius but I was able to  explore colors that I had not used before and glazing pastels on top of other bright colors without any underpaintings.

Lake George painting

 

Wednesday night oil sketches

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Here is a oil painting sketch of Moolack beach where I’m trying to capture the wind blowing across the sands while reflecting the sky during low tide. I’m using Arches oil paper which in theory should be awesome. As someone with a full time job outside of art, time for art is always limited. I have been looking and trying  various  supports that will simplify the task of art production (prepping canvases or boards until I win the lottery and can pay for my own studio assistant) and give me more time to paint. Unfortunately the Arches oil paper is as unappealing to me as their watercolor paper. It has the texture of a bounty paper towel and it is WAY too absorbent—it somehow doesn’t let me to remove any paint off the paper which for me is one of the defining characteristics of the oil paint medium—it’s malleability and wiping-off ease. So anyways for this study, I’m not even trying to do much glazing or thin layers. I’m aiming for bold, thick layers which I would never do on a canvas or linen but I almost have to do on this oil paper. I also did an under layer of acrylic. Actually I think this paper should be marketed as acrylic paper because it is thick and it is pretty decent for acrylics. But the paper is way too expensive to use for just that purpose.

So far this painting is too aggressive and chaotic to me. On this paper it’s hard to make the subtle blends that the location really calls for.  This painting just goes to show you how hard it is to paint simply. I’ve been admiring Katherine Bradford‘s oil painting work for a long time. Her work uses the icons and imagery of children’s art….superheroes, boats, and simplified human forms..but the work is decidedly not childish…it’s beautiful and masterfully done. All the haters that look at this type of work and say I could do that…trust me it’s not as easy as it looks.

Katherine Bradford found on hyperallergic.com
Katherine Bradford found on hyperallergic.com
Katherine Bradford found on painters-table.com

I also did another oil painting study of Bandon beach. We went down to the southern Oregon coast earlier this month. I haven’t posted about that trip but stay tuned. It was AWESOME!!!

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It’s at a stage where I like the looseness and softness (and the maroon color glazes) and I debate if I should continue and risk losing what I’ve already done by potentially overworking it. I’ll probably just keep going.

Emily Henderson, writer of the  design blog I read everyday, says that in the early stage of a creative career, it’s quantity over quality that matters. So in that spirit no point in being a perfectionist and being scared to ruin this painting….right now it’s about learning and exploring.

 

 

Siletz Bay

Siletz Bay near Lincoln City on Highway 101 is a great family friendly beach option.

Siletz Bay

It’s right next to Mo’s Seafood, a restaurant that has got their operations locked down, I mean they get you in and out – fast- and the food is reliably good. Get the clam chowder in a bread bowl. Of course if you have kiddos be warned that even though the wait is only ever 10 minutes at peak holiday times, you will be forced to go through their gift shop to get to your table. Brilliant business.

There’s parking near the restaurant with public bathrooms. The lot does get filled up early, but it was pretty easy to find street parking near there. My definition of easy street parking is a ginormous amount of space that you can pull straight into. No backing up or parallel parking.

And the beach is not windy. I will post about these other beaches on the Oregon Coast where I felt like I was lost in  a wild sandstorm, and then had the brilliant idea to lose my iphone.  But anyways Siletz Bay is relatively more protected from the beach, and while I usually would strongly recommend bringing some kind of umbrella/tent/ shade, this beach is fine for lounging about with just a towel.

One thing that is very interesting about Siletz Bay is how much it changes from low tide to high tide. Here we are just hanging out on this enormous stretch of sand with no neighbors as typical of the OR coast.

It almost looks like we could just wade across to that peninsula/sand bar that is in the distance.  But come high tide, and then the beach becomes a bay.

I was shocked how far inland the water comes in. What was a fun splash through some puddles to get to where we were sunbathing earlier in the day, would have been a full on potential Darwin Award ordeal to ford the bay during high tide.

These changes make Siletz Bay a very interesting place to explore, with these cool pools and ripples that form during low tide.

And speaking of Darwin Awards, my favorite part of Siletz Bay are the three rock formations that are near the road.

During low tide, you can simply walk from the parking lot near Mo’s all the way to this area.

There’s actually another parking lot on 101 that is directly adjacent to this area. But I guess they don’t really want people to hike down this part, because the path is pretty steep and they actually have completely blocked off the entrance with a wooden fence.

Siletz Bay

I had an awesome time climbing these rocks and perching along side these trees to get a spectacular view of the bay.

But climbing down from there was a bit more precarious than I would have liked.

Oregon Coast: Moolack Beach

Moolack Beach

Ok, so I already expressed my love for Beverly Beach. And I’m not sure where technically Moolack Beach starts and Beverly Beach ends. The Oregon coast is great like that…it’s so expansive.

Anyway when we went to Moolack Beach we had the bright idea to bring our tent. Having a tent on the Oregon Coast was a brilliant thing..shielding us from the sun and and the wind, and we got a nice private area to snooze in. Naps on the beach are a win!

#pnw #oregon tents are great for the beach #camping #adventure #bestoforegon

A photo posted by Betsyness (@betsyness) on

Not sure if we’re technically allowed to have a fire on the beach, so shhhh don’t tell anyone. Food tastes soooo much better over a wood fire.

campfire Moolack Beach

Yes we enjoy long walks on the beach.

Heading off into the sunset…

Breathtaking Beverly Beach

We liked this state park so much that we went back and camped on Thanksgiving week. Because pilgrim sandwiches and canned cranberries are so much better by the fire on the Oregon Coast 🙂

The entrance to Beverly Beach is actually underneath Highway 101. Neat!

 

I was obsessed with the way the sand looked at low tide, the ripples and the shimmer.

Low tide ripples #beach #oregoncoast #pnwcollective #pnwonderland #pnw #oregon #grammaster3

A photo posted by Betsyness (@betsyness) on

Because I had anticipated some stormy late autumn weather, we booked a yurt.

We actually had awesome weather. And then we came back to Portland for the start of the rainiest December on record. It rained, A LOT. And it sucked. So I guess our glamping on the beach was kind of like the eye of the storm, tricking us into a false sense of security and bam! rain for days. I’ve never ever seen it rain that hard for so long. But enough of the doom and gloom, check out these amazing views.

And man look at this sunset. The sand was so smooth and endless … I really have no words. And yes this photo was #nofilter, that was all mother nature.

I couldn’t resist..here’s one more:

Road’s End

Road’s End State Park caught me by surprise. It was a last minute addition to my Memorial Day trip and it quickly earned itself a place in my top 5 locations to the Oregon Coast. Impressive.

Road's End State Park

This beach is very long, and a large stretch is very windy. Bring your hat and sunscreen. Plan on walking over a mile to get to the best part, Road’s End Point. It’s well worth the trip. There the sand turns into a floor of kelp covered rocks.

Road's End State Park

I remember the Monterey Bay Aquarium in California as one of my favorite childhood trips because of their great interactive exhibits of tide pools. At Road’s End, you can see real tide pools up close. They form in between the rocks and crevices and you can see kelp, barnacles, mussels, crabs, and schools of tiny fish. The only thing missing were starfish.

Road's End State Park

There’s another beach that’s tucked behind the cove that you need to climb across boulders to get to. I’d recommend making the trip during low tide.

Road's End State Park

Road's End State Park

This beach is made of these perfectly tiny pebbles, so smooth and fine grained, like a nice exfoliant.

Road's End State Park

There were also collections of larger rocks that reminded me of my trips to the rock store in the NJ mall.

So many piles of shiny black rocks, jasper, agate, and other unknown rocks to sift through. I so wished I had a giant excavator to grab all of these great river rock for my front yard.

Road's End State Park

 

 

Oregon Coast: Lincoln City and Fogarty Creek

About a year ago, my friend Rachel from Pittsburgh visited and we took her to the Central Oregon Coast, near Lincoln City.

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Lincoln City is awesome and has lots of commerce to appeal to tourists but for whatever reason is not as crowded as Seaside – and I like it that way. On that stretch of 101, there are so many great beaches to choose from. Where I grew up, on the East Coast, getting familiar with your neighbors is an inevitable part of beachgoing (unless you’re rich and own a waterfront property). But here in Oregon, it’s fabulous. I mean such wide expansive views of sea and sand, and enough space for everyone.  I love the beaches here.

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Fogarty Creek wasn’t even on my radar when researching beaches and state parks on the beach. I think we randomly found it one time after driving back from the grocery store.

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Fogarty Creek is special because of the mossy green rocks that you can play near. Depending on the tide, the waves will come crashing up and create little waterfalls.

Fogarty Creek

Also there’s this view of some kind of hotel or condo complex, which by the way are usually tucked back away from the coast.

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It feels European, but what do I know, maybe that’s just me because I really want to go to Croatia so bad.